Words with the same pronunciation

Words with the same pronunciation
There are many words in English that are pronounced the same but spelled differently. The following pairs of words are explained at separate entries in this book because they are often confused:
bass - base, bear - bare, born - borne, break - brake, cereal - serial, chord - cord, complement - compliment, council - counsel, curb - kerb, currant - current, die - dye, draught - draft, fair - fare, here - hear, pore - pour, principal - principle, role - roll, sow - sew, stationary - stationery, there - their, waist - waste, whether - weather
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The entries are usually at the pairs of words given above, but see entries at ↑ there and ↑ whether for information about words pronounced like these words.
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Note that `paw' is pronounced the same as `pore' and `pour', and `poor' is also often pronounced the same. `So' is pronounced the same as `sew' and `sow'.
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There are many other pairs of words with the same pronunciation. Some of the commonest ones are listed below.
altar - alter, berry - bury, blew - blue, boar - bore, bough - bow, bread - bred, bridal - bridle, caught - court, cell - sell, coarse - course, core - corps, creak - creek, cue - queue, cymbal - symbol, dear - deer, dew - due, earn - urn, feat - feet, fir - fur, flaw - floor, flea - flee, flour - flower, fort - fought, foul - fowl, gorilla - guerrilla, grate - great, hair - hare, hangar - hanger, heal - heel, heard - herd, heroin - heroine, hoarse - horse, hole - whole, key - quay, knead - need, knew - new, knight - night, knot - not, know - no, lain - lane, leak - leek, lessen - lesson, loan - lone, made - maid, mail - male, main - mane, maize - maze, medal - meddle, miner - minor, moan - mown, morning - mourning, naval - navel, none - nun, one - won, packed - pact, pain - pane, peace - piece, peal - peel, pedal - peddle, peer - pier, place - plaice, plain - plane, pole - poll, pray - prey, profit - prophet, raise - raze, rap - wrap, raw - roar, retch - wretch, ring - wring, road - rode, root - route, sail - sale, sauce - source, scene - seen, sea - see, seam - seem, shear - sheer, sole - soul, some - sum, son - sun, stair - stare, stake - steak, stalk - stork, steal - steel, storey - story, tail - tale, tear - tier, threw - through, throne - thrown, toe - tow, too - two, vain - vein, wail - whale, wait - weight, war - wore, warn - worn, way - weigh, weak - week, which - witch, whine - wine
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Note that the verb `read' has the same pronunciation as `reed', but its past form, also spelled `read', has the same pronunciation as `red'.
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The noun `lead' has the same pronunciation as `led', the past form of the verb `lead'.
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There are also the following groups of words which are pronounced the same:
awe - oar - ore, buy - by - bye, cent - scent - sent, cite - sight - site, flew - flu - flue, meat - meet - mete, pair - pare - pear, peak - peek - pique, rain - reign - rein, rite - right - write, saw - soar - sore, ware - wear - where
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Useful english dictionary. 2012.

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